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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
of having to continue the united states preeminence, not just in the space program but in terms of science and everything else that goes along, it ended up being washed away in stimulus funds. as this hearing has highlighted, the approach to this lacks clear mission. he is relying on the success of commercial space. i strongly support a public /private partnership for our space policy. it is up to now said to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector does the not have enough funds to do it by itself. that rocket means a net to overcome the administration's shortsightedness. they supported a mission to the moon. president obama has taken a been there done that approach. we have not been there for 40 years. the partners would have helped us. they have never been there. this will fill the void be left behind. that will have a trickle down of that on the number of people that we train as scientists and engineers to keep america's pre- eminence in practically everything else. would you please discuss the problems caused by the cancellation of the program and what is needed from c
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
and the last day on tuesday >>> we've seen break throughs in science and john has the top ten science stories at 2010 >> a revolutionary light called litro. >> this will change how we take and experience pictures. >> the camera captures the light field, allowing focus to be changed after it has been taken. no. 9, nasa space craft sent data about an asteroid. it appears vesta went through planet evolution and it's one of a kind. to be one of e only one that's left. >> no. 8, you may have heard the term god pardon cal. the european nuclear center claims to have found it. why is it a ci,]w:qbig deal? think big bang theory. >> in this particle, this set off the explosion that creates the universe. >> after analyzing data generated by an accelerator. >> at 7, a leap of faith. record breaking jump. bub broke the free fall record jumping from 128,000 feet in a space suit. >> i said the whole world is watching and i wish the world could see. cambodiag5a[([ and a package cac 71 was aggressive. he was there when the mystery was solved. >> those organizism and them getting steroids. >> no. 5, space was
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
's is a challenge the antiscience and pro science rubric, and i wonder if you'd say that in fact it can withstand that sort of thing as we look at it over time, whether it's a little bit of a too shallow way of looking at things whether it's chris mooney on the left and the approach you have here. the things are more complicate than pro science or antiscience would have thought. >> you're absolutely correct there is a role for bioethics in science, okay and n and i would be hesitant to call someone antiscience if they are objecting to something on biothal grounds. you can gate ph.d in bioethics. that's how complicated this field has become. so i agree there's a value in not just plowing forward and doing whatever we want, whenever we want there is a wrote from jurrasic park, we were so obsessed to see if we could do thing, we never stopped to think if we should. so heaven forbid i get my philosophy from jurrasic park, but he makes a good point. i come on the side that embryonic stem cells is something we should be doing, including induced stem cells. you prove we don't need embryonic stem cells.
will continue. investment in science, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, make sure that we are bringing young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economy is for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of the economy and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and insuring the long term future of nasa, and essentials generator for our economy, insuring that stay at home moms and dads to work so hard raising children and contributing to the community to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard ridge is a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> the word shouldn't change from the original constitution, surely. >> my words aren't based on the constitution. >> i get that, but what it is is about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie. daniel day-lewis was great as lincoln. it was all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was acceptable who were outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular for the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> but we -- >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says that every man should be free. >> right, but you don't think every man should be free and equal. >> no -- of course we're free. and of course we're equal. >> what does that mean? >> you can love anybody you want to. >> but you don't think a gay man or woman should
have to do is look at what works. this is not rocket science. i came to washington as a novice in politics, believing in the power of ideas, seeing how ideas can revolutionize different industries, can create new products and services meeting the needs of customers everywhere. and that's what i hoped we could do here in washington. maybe naively i went to work in the house, often working with the heritage foundation to create a better product here in washington. i saw social security, and not many people look below the surface, but we knew it was going broke. we knew we were taking in money that people were paying for this social security retirement benefit, but we were spending it all. and i thought, what an opportunity it would be for future generations, for my children, if we actually saved what people were putting into social security for their retirement. and you didn't have to do too much math to see that even for middle-class workers that americans could be millionaires when they retired if we even kept half of what was put into social security for them. it seemed like a
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
americans dug bomb shelters and worried about muss ills science spelled national security. >> the cold war had been pro clonged it was going on nobody could really see an end to it. there were all of the underlying risk of nuclear confrontations in the times. >> man wants it that required a few good men 7 to start with. >> there was 110 selected by the air force and navy. ithittled down to 32 after the interviews. 32 of us went to the clinic and i was the only guy to fly. oo i i had a high belly reuben which was a pigment in your blood. based on that they said well you are out. >> at the time your little boy was into dinosaurs and rockettes. you were not into dinosaurs. >> when i didn't get into the mercury program i was interested in rockettes before the guys could spell. >> project mercury began in 1958 with the goal to put a hman in orbit and doing so before the soviets could. on the second count they failed. 3 and a half years after the sputnik shock on april 12th, 1961, the soviets out paced the u.s. once again when confidante became the first human being in space. >> they beat us int
where america worried about missiles, science spelled "national security." >> the cold war was prolonged, it was going on and no one could see an end to it, and there were underlying risks of nuclear confrontation. >> the next step in the race was manned launches that required a few good men, seven to start. >> there were 110 originally selected to become astronauts by the air force and navy and it became a list of 326789 i was the only guy to flunk. i had what was known as pink pigment in the blood and they said, well, you know, you are out. >> you said at time when you were a boy you were not into dinosaurs. >>guest: when i did not get in the original selection i was interested in rockets before they could spelt -- spell it. >> the goal was to put a human in orbit before the soviets. on the second count they failed and 3 1/2 years after the shock of april 12, 1961, the soviets outpaced the united states again when a cosmonaut was the first human being in space. >> they beat us into orbit so we were behind. we were lagging. >> america scrambled to catch up less than a month later, on ma
display at the smithsonian in d.c. and the california science center in los angeles. >>> also another story we want to bring you out of florida. just check this out. unwelcome visitor at a picnic area in the everglades. look at that. family on vacation from arkansas took this video after a 17-foot burmese python was shot and killed by park rangers. the giant snakes, many of them former pets, have become a big, big, big nuisance in south florida. next month florida game officials will hold a hunting contest offering a $15,000 prize to the person who kills the most pythons. >>> all right, let's turn from snakes to flakes. the massive storm that's been causing huge problems since christmas day is finally over. maine was the last to deal with it. some places got a foot of fresh snow, but it's not over yet. meteorologist chad myers is in the cnn weather center with a look at that. so chad, you know, i thought when this storm came through, all right, fine. it wasn't so great. lots of snow. >> right. >> but it's over. not over yet. >> no, not over yet. and another one coming on its heels. an
, cruise ship on its side in the water. well, now think about the advances made in science. some of them dazzle the eye. john zarrella counts down the top ten. >> reporter: at number ten a revolutionary camera called litro. >> it is such a powerful technology breakthrough that this will forever change how we all take inexperienced pictures. >> reporter: the camera captures the entire light field allowing the picture's focus and perspective to be changed after it's been taken. number nine, nasa's dawn spacecraft sent back staggering data about an asteroid 325 miles in diameter called vesta. it appears vesta went through some stages of planetary evolution. it's one of a kind in the solar system. >> what's clear to us is that vesta appears to be the only intact proto planet that's left. >> reporter: number eight. you may have heard the term god particle. scientists call it higsbosin. the european nuclear research corporation claims to have found it. why is it a big deal? think big bang theory. >> and this particle we think was in fact a particle like this was the fuse that set off the explo
. we look at the major advances in science and technology. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello wishing you and yours a very merry christmas. we begin this hour with pope benedict using his annual christmas message to speak about the hope for peace even in the most difficult times and situations. just hours ago the 85-year-old pope spoke before a crowd in st. peter's square and to millions of others watching around the world he says even in syria, a nation embroiled in a nearly two-year long civil war, peace is possible. >> translator: may peace bring for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which does not spare even the defenseless and reaps innocent victims. once again, i appeal for an end to the bloodshed. easier access for the relief of refugees and the displaced and dialogue in the pursuit of a political solution to the conflict. >> the pope also spoke out against violence against christians in nigeria and wrapped up his address by delivering christmas greetings in 65 languages. >>> in bethlehem peop
. >>> it is hard to believe, but 2013 less than a week away. we're going to look back at all the science breakthroughs of the last year coming up. ♪ everybody well don't you know it's me now? ♪ ♪ yeah who's it, who's it huh? ♪ ♪ willy's back with a brand new beat now, ♪ ♪ yeah doin' it doin' it up! ♪ heyyy yeah, tryin' to bite my style! ♪ ♪ heyyy yeah, how you like me now? ♪ ♪ na na na na na na na na ♪ and everybody go uh! campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> starbucks is now pushing politicians to avoid the massive spending cuts due to go into effect six dames from now. the ceo is asking employees at the d.c. area stores to write "come together" on their coffee cups tomorrow and friday. in a letter to employees made public today, shuttle says rather than be bystanders, you and your customers have an opportunity and i believe we all have a responsibility, to send our elected officials a respectful but poten
10 science stories of the 2012. >> reporter: at number 10, a revolutionary camera called litro. >> it's so powerful that this will forever change how we're experience pictures. >> reporter: the camera captures the entire light field allowing the picture's focus and perspective to be changed after it's been taken. number 9, nasa's dawn space craft spent back data about an asteroid called vesta. it appears vesta went through some stages of planetary evolution. it's one of a kind in the solar system. >> what's clear to us is vesta appears to be the only intact protoplanet that's left. >> reporter: number 8. you may have heard the god partg dlo big deal? think big bang theory. >> this particle we think was the fuse that set off the explosion which created the universe. >> reporter: researchers found after analyzing data from proton collisions generated by a particle accelerator. at 7, baumgartner's record breaking jump. he broke the sound barrier, jumping from 128,000 feet in a revolutionary space suit. >> i said i know the whole world is watching now and i wish the world could see what
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)